Issue 14
Practice

One in three of use will get cancer. Not a good statistic. So we look at ways of preventing it and take advantage of screening where we can.

For we ladies, that means three-yearly mamograms once we get to a certain age. But what if a mammogram isn't good enough? For those with dense breast tissue, tumours are often hidden so go unnoticed until it is too late.

Here, Cheryl Cruwys explains what dense breast tissue is and shares her experience.


Issue 14
Practice

You've done it again! Not content with merely trying to deliver a service in the face of swingeing cuts, more patients and less staff, you've been innovating, creating and generally making life easier for your patients.

So in what looks like becoming the annual 'must be there' event, awards were presented to those of you whom your peers had decided were worth a prize!

In issue 13, we presented some of the winners' stories. Here we present the rest.


Issue 14
Out of the Ordinary

In Issue 10 we featured some highlights from the 2015 Ig noble Awards for Improbable research. We liked it so much, we decided to do it again!

As the committee says:

The 26th First Annual Ig Nobel Prize Ceremony will introduce ten new Ig Nobel Prize winners. Each has done something that makes people laugh then think.Winners travel to the ceremony, at their own expense, from around the world to receive their prize from a group of genuine, genuinely bemused Nobel Laureates

 

 

Picture Credit: Roman Victory. Thanks to Liam Quin for kind permission to reproduce: http://www.fromoldbooks.org

 


Issue 12
Practice

In recent years, lymphoedema has come to prominence as a key issue for the NHS.Accelerate CIC, an established specialist lymphoedema provider in Tower Hamlets since 2008, launched a new model for providing Community Lymphoedema Services to patients across Hackney. This is their story.


Issue 12
Practice

Some see the use of external (non-NHS) providers as a BAD Thing for the NHS. However, in this article, Nic Parkes, Senior Communications Manager for Virgin Care, outlines how after winning the contract to provide community services in Surrey, worked with nurses and GPs to improve care delivery and communication.


Issue 12
Out of the Ordinary

In the last issue, we presented the 2016 Molnlycke Wound Academy Scholarship and Award Winners. Here, we take a look at the winning entry in the Innovations in care: Pressure Ulcer Care Award. The UHCW NHS Trust Tissue Viability Team, Amy Verdon, Viola Sidambe and Rachel Reece are using a dolll, Sally Sore as an innovative way of teaching and demonstrating pressure ulcer prevention srategies.


Issue 11
Out of the Ordinary

Many of shy away from public exercise - after all, gym's are full of tall and toned people in tight lycra who still look impossibly glamorous even while 'glowing' gently. What could possibly be the problem?

 

So what is different about taking your exercise regimen to the park? Well, lots apparently. Here, George Winter explains.


Issue 11
Policy & Management

'Compassion in Practice' concluded this year. So what is next? Oh look, another document, Leading Change, Adding Value, which according to Jane Cummings

"...is a framework every nursing, midwifery and care professional, in all settings, can use to ensure that we achieve the best quality of experience for our patients and people, the best health and well-being outcomes for our populations, and use finite resources wisely to get best value for every pound spent".

 

Here is the executive summary

 


Issue 8
Practice

Exudate management is one of the most challenging aspects of wound care. In this article, Sylvie Hampton outlines why managing exudate is important and how dressings contribute to effective healing.


Issue 7
Practice

Using suction to remove toxins or to stimulate wound perfusion is not new. However, the therapeutic use of mechanical negative pressure for wound management has developed exponentially over the past three decades, with a consequent rise in the number of therapies available. In this article, Sylvie Hampton guides us through the use of negative pressure.


Issue 6
Comment & Opinion

Well, it’s finally here. The Code (2015) became effective from 31st March.  Many believe it was sorely needed. Others believe it is just more ‘gumpf’. Yet this version will have more impact upon registrants as revalidation depends on adhering to and demonstrating where you have applied its principles. In this opinion piece, Brian Booth and Deborah Glover share their thoughts about the new Code.


Issue 6
Out of the Ordinary

Whistle-blowing is the act of reporting a concern about a risk, wrongdoing or illegality at work, in the public interest.

Raising concerns about such poor practice should be the norm, accepted as an important part of people’s day-to-day work, as they reflect on their professional practice and work to improve their service. 


Issue 4
Practice

A large part of neuropsychiatry consists of medicines management. Patients may have been prescribed medicines for signs and symptoms which turn out to have no physical cause. Psychoactive drugs tend to need careful management, so there is often a lengthy process of weaning off one drug whilst introducing new ones (whose dosage needs titrating), all the while monitoring the patient carefully.

Changes in prescriptions may take some time to filter down to the pharmacists, who might continue to dispense repeat prescriptions for a lengthy period before they become aware of any changes. This article outlines how one nurse found a simple answer to this problem.


Issue 4
Product Review

Granulox (Infirst Healthcare) is an innovative haemoglobin spray which improves the oxygen supply to chronic wounds through simplified diffusion, thereby promoting wound healing. 


Issue 3
Practice

Skin tears are described as traumatic wounds that result from a separation in the two principle layers of the skin, the dermis and epidermis. While the STAR (Skin Tear Audit Research) tool classification of skin tears is helpful, it was recognised that wide variations in practice occur; in an attempt to address this, the International Skin Tear Advisory Panel (ISTAP) was established. Here, Annie Clothier reviews the skin tear guidance the group produced.


Issue 3
Education and Societies

The Lindsay Leg Club Model (LLC) was conceived as a unique partnership between the district nursing team and the local community, in which patients are empowered, through a sense of ownership to become stakeholders in their own treatment. This article gives a brief overview of the model, and concludes with a blog, written by David Foster Deputy Director of Nursing and Midwifery Advisor at the Department of Health, after his visit to Mottingham Leg Club.


Issue 2
Practice: peer reviewed

Lymphoedema is frequently misunderstood and thus mismanaged. This article, taken from the document ‘Best Practice For the Management of Lymphoedema – 2nd Edition: Surgical Intervention – A position document on surgery for lymphoedema’, outlines the causes of this disease, its classification and progression and the signs to be aware of.


Issue 2
Practice: peer reviewed

The cornerstones of lymphoedema management as outlined in the literature include:

  • manual lymphatic drainage (MLD)
  • compression therapy
  • exercise and skin care

Compression bandaging plays a central role in the management of all forms of chronic oedema and lymphoedema.


Issue 2
Practice

Patients receiving end-of-life care are susceptible to pressure ulcers and other wounds. However, all too often, these are viewed as untreatable as it is unlikely that they will heal. In this article, Helen Mountford, the 2014 Mölnlycke Wound Academy Scholarship winner, outlines why wound care is important in paediatric end-of-life care, her work in this area to date, and what she hopes to achieve as a result of winning the Scholarship.


Issue 2
Education and Societies

Following on from our interview with Crystal Oldman, Chief executive of the Queen’s Nursing Institute (QNI), Sharel Cole, a Queen’s Nurse (QN) gives us some insight into why she applied to be a QN and what she feels this has helped her achieve.


Issue 1
Practice

Although honey has been used for wound/infection management for millennia, it was only ‘rediscovered’ as a topical antibacterial agent in 1892. Ian Staples explores the benefits of this remarkable treatment.


Issue 1
Product Focus & Reviews

Within three short months of their daughter Florence’s birth, Judith and Chris Parsons’ world was turned upside down. Eczema was diagnosed and standard creams and emollients for symptom control prescribed.


Issue 1
Product Focus & Reviews

Currently there is no cure for these distressing and often disabling conditions, and service provision for affected patients appears to be inconsistent.  Current recommended treatment is aimed at decreasing swelling, pain and discomfort, using a combination of massage and compression garments known as Complex Decongestive Therapy (CDT), or Decongestive Lymphatic Therapy (DLT).


Issue 1
Out of the Ordinary

An introduction to Lipoedema Ladies by Michelle Ellis

I found out I had Lipoedema when it was too late. I was 30 and had already developed Lipo-Lymphoedema. I am lucky I was diagnosed at all: there are 3.2 million women in the UK with undiagnosed Lipoedema.